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Hypothetically Trading Up For Anthony Rendon

I'll say this up front: what I'm about to discuss is completely impossible. Baseball's collective bargaining agreement specifically prohibits clubs from trading draft picks after Pete Incaviglia forced his way out of Montreal and onto the Texas Rangers. So, even if the Astros wanted to, they couldn't trade up in this year's draft.

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But, since the stock of Rice super third baseman Anthony Rendon has slipped enough to where he's not considered a lock for the first overall pick, it's worth asking the question. If they could, would it be worth it for Houston to trade up to get the slugger? 

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This article over at Beyond the Box Score talks about whether the Mariners are better off basically passing on the No. 2 pick and waiting for next season, because of injury concerns to Rendon and TCU left-hander Matt Purke. If the Mariners wanted out of that spot, what would it take to move up there?

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Rendon has had some injury issues, but he's completely recovered from what could have been a catastrophic ankle injury. His hitting has slowed this season because of a shoulder injury and now some clubs are worried that he might just be injury prone. But, 90 percent of the first round third baseman in the past  few years have gone on to reach the majors leagues. Even if Rendon doesn't become a once-a-generation talent (which he still has the chance to be), he's going to be at least a big league regular at a tough position to fill. He's also going to play solid defense.

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Is it worth it for a team like the Astros, with no clear future starter at third base, to trade some of its draft picks (No. 11 overall, No. 99 and maybe a fifth rounder) or some combination of players (Jiovanni Mier or Tanner Bushue come to mind) for a shot at taking a gamble on Rendon's health?

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If they could trade picks, I don't think Houston would be alone in seeking out Rendon. If he falls past Seattle, he's not going to fall for long.

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